CGD Podcast Episode 29 – My Life In Videogames

This episode goes into my history as a videogame player (more than a designer) and talks about how recently I’ve been sort of regretting how much time I’ve spent playing videogames. Of all of the episodes of this show, this is the one I’m least confident about, in terms of, it doesn’t have some super strong “thesis statement”. So if that sounds like something that you wouldn’t want to listen to, you’ve been warned. Hopefully there’s some value in it for some listeners.

Thanks for listening!

CGD Podcast Episode 21: The “Classics” Problem

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What does it mean when something is a “classic”? I think there’s actually a huge problem here that needs to be explored. New work is created using new cultural and scientific understandings, and it’s universally better in almost every case. We need to understand and appreciate this fact, and stop glorifying things just because they’re old.

In this episode, you’ll also hear me talk about classic games like Go and Chess, as well as talk about a better distinction between art and entertainment. Enjoy, and let me know what you think below.

Thanks for listening! Support the show here.

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The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 5 – The Limitations of Boardgames

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While it’s tempting to think otherwise, computers are the best tool we have for pursuing great game designs. In this episode, I also talk about how “abstract” games are problematic due to low information density, the information horizon, and a lot about the medium of board games.

 

Some relevant links:

http://boardgamegeek.com/browse/boardgame – all game designers should make an attempt to get as familiar with as many of the top ~300 or so boardgames as they can.

http://keithburgun.net/uncapped-look-ahead-and-the-information-horizon/ – Yet another link to this article!

Nethack Wiki – Just hit “random page” a few times to see what an insane amount of content there is in this game.

2013 NYU Practice talk – Art of Strategy

 

As always, please visit my Patreon page to support the show. Thanks for listening!

The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 3 – Tech Myths

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Three podcast episodes in three days! My intention here was to get the podcast really rolling up front. I feel like it’s kinda crappy to have a podcast with one episode, and two episodes isn’t much better. So now there are three, which is a comfortable starting place, I think.

Quickly I’d like to let people know: I submitted the podcast to iTunes two days ago. Still waiting on the approval; from what I’ve read it can take between 30 minutes and 3 weeks (!). Hopefully it won’t be too much longer.

Today’s episode talks about some of the mythology that we’ve all accepted about technology – specifically virtual reality, AI, and graphics technology above all else. We sort of expect these things to solve our problems for us, but the truth is that they won’t.

(This episode doesn’t make much mention of fan comments, but I’ll get back to that next episode, promise.)

I referenced my Toys and the Adult Mind article, which might be worth a read.

Thanks for listening, and as always, you can support the show by going to http://www.patreon.com/keithburgun.

Psychological Exploitation Games

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We tend to think about things that are designed to cultivate addiction with disgust for a very good reason. When we think about casinos, or drug dealers, or pyramid schemes, I think it’s reasonable to have a strongly negative reaction; even more so when we think about those who actually end up falling into the chasm – those who get addicted. Addiction is a terrible thing, and those who actively try to bring it on should be – and mostly are – maligned in our society. Our disgusted responses to “the drug dealer” or “the pyramid scheme salesperson” are useful defense mechanisms against something that’s actually “offensive”; something that goes on the offense against our well-being and mental health. Continue reading