Push the Lane!

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I’ve been working on this game now for over a year. It started as an abstract strategy game that was kind of like bejeweled or something, and then I decided to take it in a D&D Boxing direction with the Battle Blast theme.

Now the design is maturing in a lot of ways. One small example: instead of your attacks dealing random amounts of damage, minions have a random amount of health. So it’s basically just one of the ways to convert the output randomness to input randomness.

Another neat thing: you have stats, like attack damage and items that change that, and the enemies have health and armor and all of that, but health is visually represented as pips underneath a minion that simply “how many of your attacks it WILL take to take down this minion”.

Here’s a rundown.

Theme
It’s an American Gladiators or Nickelodeon’s Guts! type of TV game show. A sport – played single player, against basically an advanced strategic obstacle course, fighting robotic minions.

Continue reading “Push the Lane!”

Uncapped Look-Ahead and the Information Horizon

chess

I write a lot about how bad output randomness is for games, but today I want to write about a problem common in many deterministic games – specifically ones that lack hidden information.

Why doesn’t everyone just play chess, if it’s so great? The answer is that chess, or other ancient abstracts like Go and shogi, or even modern abstracts like the Gipf games, Through the Desert or Hive – these games really aren’t that great. They are all largely “look-ahead contests”, and people pick up on this, consciously or subconsciously, and it makes them all kind of annoying to play.

 

Look-Ahead

Here’s the process of look-ahead in action: what will happen if I make move X? Once move X is made, what will happen if the opponent makes moves A, B or C? If he should make move A, then I can make moves D, E or F… and so on. It’s literally scanning through every possible (or reasonably valid-seeming) move that you can. Games of chess, at least at novice and intermediate levels of play, tend to come down to simply who does more of this. One way to put it is that it’s a matter of quantity, not quality. Continue reading “Uncapped Look-Ahead and the Information Horizon”

I’m launching a Patreon campaign!

become-my-patron-on-patreonI’m launching a Patreon campaign to support my article writing and possibly help me create other game-design-related media.

With my second book, Clockwork Game Design finished (it will be out March of next year), I want to really up my game in terms of article writing. You’ll notice that I’ve re-designed my site. That’s only the beginning! I want to write articles more regularly and constantly increase the level of quality with each article.

Further, I want to go back and maintain articles. I want to update, or in some cases completely re-do articles if they’re no longer valid/relevant. In other words, I want keithburgun.net to be a reliable source for the latest in cutting-edge game design philosophy.

Help support my contributions to the field of game design and the community. Support me on Patreon today!