Designing Strategy: Rushdown, Economy, and Defense

Hey everyone! Today I have a good-old-fashioned formalist-ish game design article. It’s been a little while since I’ve really done one of those, unless it was attached to Push the Lane.

This article is also a little bit different than a lot of my other work because I usually talk about rulesets: what the actual rules are. I tend to talk less about, within a set of rules, what players can do. Today, I’m talking about designing strategy space, and a specific way to think about the strategies that players can pursue in your game.

“The triangle”

If you’re into strategy games, you probably at least loosely know the basic idea behind “rushdown” (or “rush”), “economy” (or “econ”), and “defense“. A lot of us first heard these terms in RTS games like StarCraft, wherein the “zergling rush” was a very common and easy-to-understand manifestation of a “rush strategy”. Terrans building a ton of bunkers and missile turrets and siege tanks was a pretty clear example of “defense”, and expanding (getting another base with another source of minerals) was an “economy” play. In some games, it can be seen as a triangle, or rock-paper-scissors relationship, with rush beating econ, econ beating defense, and defense beating rush. It’s worth noting that “rushdown” is not, itself, a strategy, but rather a family or style of strategies in a given game. There may be many different rushdown strategies. Also, it’s spectral. You may pursue a strategy that’s like 60% rush-y, or 80% rush-y, etc. Continue reading