Designing Strategy: Rushdown, Economy, and Defense

Hey everyone! Today I have a good-old-fashioned formalist-ish game design article. It’s been a little while since I’ve really done one of those, unless it was attached to Push the Lane.

This article is also a little bit different than a lot of my other work because I usually talk about rulesets: what the actual rules are. I tend to talk less about, within a set of rules, what players can do. Today, I’m talking about designing strategy space, and a specific way to think about the strategies that players can pursue in your game.

“The triangle”

If you’re into strategy games, you probably at least loosely know the basic idea behind “rushdown” (or “rush”), “economy” (or “econ”), and “defense“. A lot of us first heard these terms in RTS games like StarCraft, wherein the “zergling rush” was a very common and easy-to-understand manifestation of a “rush strategy”. Terrans building a ton of bunkers and missile turrets and siege tanks was a pretty clear example of “defense”, and expanding (getting another base with another source of minerals) was an “economy” play. In some games, it can be seen as a triangle, or rock-paper-scissors relationship, with rush beating econ, econ beating defense, and defense beating rush. It’s worth noting that “rushdown” is not, itself, a strategy, but rather a family or style of strategies in a given game. There may be many different rushdown strategies. Also, it’s spectral. You may pursue a strategy that’s like 60% rush-y, or 80% rush-y, etc. Continue reading

Push the Lane: Loot in a Strategy Game?

Since Push the Lane entered this latest phase back in mid-2017 (basically after the failed Kickstarter version, which was much more puzzle-game-like), it has become much more videogamey. By that, I mean, it has focused a lot more on fighting, monsters, items, special abilities, moving around a big map and such. I have been thinking of it more like “a Rogue-like DotA” recently; a turn-based, single player League of Legends.

With that thought, I always kind of had it in the corner of my mind somewhere that it would be pretty cool if the game had “loot” somehow. My general feeling and belief about loot has been, for years, that it has really no place in strategy games. But maybe there’s a way? First, let’s define the term.

What is loot?

I think most of the time the word “loot” is used, it refers to randomly dropping items. For me, the classic version of “loot” is item drops in Diablo, or a Rogue-like. More recently, it’s popular to have “loot crates” in games like Overwatch, which give the player some random metagame items, such as skins. Continue reading

Art is People Too

In this episode, I struggle with, and mostly reject, a lot of the formalist ideas I previously held about art. Art – whether it’s games, music, movies, or anything else – is largely about connecting with other people. When you like something, it’s largely because of a lot of subconscious processes that are largely informed by a specific language of art that you personally have developed for yourself, based on your own personal experiences that aren’t the same as anyone else’s. So just as I would be a pretty bad judge of West African music as someone who has very little exposure to it, I am also a bad judge of someone who makes puzzle platformers, or someone who makes death metal music. These are specific aesthetics, or languages, that I just don’t really have the cultural capital or emotional connections to connect with. But the point is, I should try. Just as I am open to meeting and having relationships with new, different kinds of people, I should be the same way with new, different kinds of art. Art is a reflection of people, and I think it’s probably healthy to look at it that way.

Also, some Push the Lane updates!

Don’t forget, you can become a patron over at http://www.patreon.com/keithburgun.

Enjoy the show! Special thanks to Aaron Oman and Jean-Marc Nielly for their generous support! <3

Interview with James Lantz, designer of Invisible, Inc.

Today I interviewed James Lantz, game designer at Klei. Among numerous other games, he was for me most notably a designer on Invisible Inc., a really interesting X-Com-ish tactical strategy game, and Mercury, a small indie Rogue-like game that really boiled down how Rogue-likes really work in the smartest way I’ve ever seen.

(By the way: yes-relation! James is the son of Frank Lantz, who you can hear in my episodes 23 and 24.)

Some topics covered:

  • How James came to work for Klei
  • Our opinions on how to market strategy games
  • A little discussion about League of Legends and last-hitting
  • Game design writing
  • A bit about what growing up as the son of a game designer was like

Thanks for listening! As always, you can support the show on Patreon by going to http://www.patreon.com/keithburgun. Thanks for listening!

 

League of Legends vs. Heroes of the Storm

I’ve got a new video out discussing why I think League of Legends is not only better than Heroes, it’s not even in the same, well, league. For more, check out my article on why I consider League of Legends to be the world’s greatest game. Enjoy!

Special thanks to Aaron Oman for his support. If you would like to support my work, please visit my Patreon page and become a Patron!

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Incremental Complexity

Announcement! In the future, I think I’ll do more articles in “video form”. Very lightly edited videos, mostly a voice over and some pictures/titles/video. I think that video seems to be where more of the conversation is happening these days. Here‘s the first video, on incremental complexity, a new way of thinking about strategy game design (designing them, and teaching them), inspired by Pandemic: Legacy.

Support my work on Patreon here! Special thanks to Patreon Patron Aaron Oman!

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