The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 11 – Good Formalism with Charles Pratt

cgdplogo_mediumToday’s episode features an hour-long discussion with game designer at NYU Game Center teacher Charles Pratt. Charles and I met at the Practice conference and had some good discussions, and I think our perspectives live at that rare place where they’re not too different so that we can’t communicate, but they’re also not so similar where we have nothing to discuss. Overall, I think it was a great conversation and I hope you guys agree.

Here’s a talk Charles did at NYU called Ground Truths: Articulating a Formalist Perspective on Games.

Also, be sure to check out Charles’ podcast (if you haven’t already), called Another Castle. His podcast hasn’t recorded an episode in a few years, but there’s a bunch of interviews there with a ton of interesting people.

As always, you can support the show by becoming a patron at Patreon.com.

Thanks for listening!

The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 10 – Design, Improvisation, and Individuality

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In today’s (short) episode I talk about design as the most consistent way to create value. I also talk about how yes, it is wonderful that we’re all special snowflakes and we should be expressing our individuality, but the idea that we do that best by creating “one draft” of our work is a myth. We express more of ourselves through the process of revision.

I also talk a bit about the concept of “can something be over-designed”, and a semi-sidetrack about general anti-science/progress thinking (as usual).

Enjoy!

Support the show here.

 

The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 9 – Popular Games

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In today’s episode, I discuss many of the world’s most popular videogames and boardgames, and analyze them through a Clockwork Game Design lens. Titles like Tetris, Grand Theft Auto, Metal Gear Solid, Super Mario Bros, as well as board games like Agricola and Android: Netrunner, and many more.

Definitely along the lines of a slightly more rambly episode, with less of a direct thesis statement than most episodes, but as I say in the episode – it’s an experiment. Let me know how it went in the comments!

Also – the show is now up on iTunes. Please consider leaving a review there if you can.

If you enjoy the show, please consider becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/keithburgun. Thanks for listening!

 

 

Clockwork Game Design: Episode 8 – Building on Structure

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This episode is about how we can and should build on the structure that we have, rather than introducing non-sequiturs or removing elements from play. Interestingly, this podcast itself ended up having a bit of a non-sequitur of its own, as I talk a bit about parting ways with my entire huge video game collection and intellectual flexibility, which isn’t actually too related to the rest of the episode. Just so I’m clear: that’s not ideal podcast design!

I also discuss Matt Stone and Trey Parker’s talk on “therefore” in storytelling.

Also relevant is episode 3 of 3 Minute Game Design.

I’ve been a bit sick the last week or so; hopefully I was good enough with the editing to hide that, but that’s also my explanation for the sidetrack.

As always, please visit the show by becoming a patron at http://www.patreon.com/keithburgun.

Clockwork Game Design: Episode 7 – Grinding, Toys, and Value

cgdplogo_twitterGrinding basically has no place in interactive systems. In this episode, I talk about why that’s my position. I also respond to a bunch of comments from my Psychological Exploitation Games article.

Also if you want to know more about my Interactive Forms.

The Clockwork Game Design Podcast: Episode 6 – Discussing the Discussion with Richard Terrell

NwE5D37lIn Episode 6 of the Clockwork Game Design Podcast, I had a discussion with Richard Terrell (@KirbyKid) that was largely about the game design discussion itself.

People may not know, that we had a discussion about three years ago, and back then, I think we both thought that we could just dive right into the conversation. What we’ve both learned since then is that if you don’t have a solid understanding of each others’ language, the conversation will go nowhere – which is precisely what tends to happen in most conversations that take place outside your “inner circle”.

Either way, we’re both formalist thinkers who are primarily interested in competitive/strategy game design, so I thought it’d be interesting to have a discussion about why it’s so hard to have a discussion. I think it went well! Here’s a few links:

Apologies about the audio in this episode, which is slightly worse than previous (or future!) episodes.